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Red to Green Food Tech 🥩🔬♻️

Red to Green Food Tech 🥩🔬♻️

By Marina Schmidt

The most in-depth podcast on how we can make the future of food sustainability. Each topic is covered in a season of 12 episodes covering different perspectives, geographies, and solutions. Go ahead and binge-listen to seasons - 1. cell-based meat, 2. sustainable packaging, 3. consumer acceptance, 4. food waste, 5. food history for the future of food, 6. biotechnology, and 7. book talks on the food system. Hosted by science and technology historian Marina Schmidt. Let's move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, from Red to Green.
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7.6. Part two - Lobbying in US vs. EU, Food Politics and Corporate Influence

Red to Green Food Tech 🥩🔬♻️ May 31, 2023

00:00
29:37
7.6. Part two - Lobbying in US vs. EU, Food Politics and Corporate Influence
May 31, 202329:37
7.5. Food Politics - How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health
May 24, 202332:29
7.4. Nanotechnology and Food Safety 💨 the good, the bad and the dusty 🔬

7.4. Nanotechnology and Food Safety 💨 the good, the bad and the dusty 🔬

Discussing the book "Future Foods, how modern science is transforming the way we eat." Nanotech is the science of dealing with materials at the size and range of nanometers. And you may wonder, okay, what is that size? Well, it's about a thousand times smaller than a human hair. And with that size also come very special benefits, but also drawbacks. The book was published in 2019 and written by David Julian. McClements is a British food scientist and distinguished professor at the University of Massachusetts.


Sources and further reading

Marina's notes on the book - https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DNqolXdycObnUnnXQq3YIs-nWCvHaBdVDYceoE2hkpc/edit?usp=sharing

Future Food Book - ⁠https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-030-12995-8⁠

"The French authorities are particularly vigilant about the dangerousness of titanium dioxide and have played a leading role in terms of scientific expertise and regulatory management proposals" - https://www.toxpartner.com/articles/france-defends-the-classification-of-titanium-dioxide-as-a-suspected-carcinogen/

A searchable database for foods that contain nanotechnology

https://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/press-releases/4075/new-database-shows-nanotechnology-in-common-food-products


LINK

Get funding for your food science research: https://en.raps-stiftung.de/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Connect with the host, Marina https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Connect with the host, Frank https://www.linkedin.com/in/frankkuehne/

Please rate the podcast on Spotify and iTunes!


Hashtags

Nanotechnology in Food, Food Safety regulation, food safety Europe, EFSA, European food safety, food regulation, food legislation, food security, food additives, food industry, future of food, food innovation, food technology


Editors Note:

M shortened the beginning 30.05.23

May 17, 202335:53
7.3. The Carbon Footprint of Everything - carbon consciousness, airfreight and the impact of food production
May 10, 202337:23
7.2. Part two - supply chains, corporate responsibility and blind spots of food tech

7.2. Part two - supply chains, corporate responsibility and blind spots of food tech

This is the second part of our discussion on the book "Stuffed and Starved - the hidden battle for our world's food system." We look at the price development at the supply chain, addressing the lack of transparency and how corporates are incentivized to process foods for higher profit. We discuss corporate and consumer responsibility. And talk about whether malnourishment is an issue of "insufficient food"?

The author Raj Patel is a British Indian. Academic journalist and activist. He holds a PhD in development and sociology from Cornell University. In this book, he focuses a lot on the inequality of our food system. The book's main thesis is that more people are overweight than people who are starving. And that's solving the issue is now our food system is not just about increasing yield. It's much more a poverty and distribution issue.

I'm joined by my amazing co-host Frank Kuehne. He's the managing partner of the Adalbert-Raps Foundation, which offers grants for scientific research in food technology, but more on that later. Let's jump right in.


LINKS

Get funding for your food science research: https://en.raps-stiftung.de/

Find out more about the book Stuffed and Starved

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Connect with the host, Marina https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Connect with the host, Frank https://www.linkedin.com/in/frankkuehne/

More info and links to resources on  https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Please rate the podcast on Spotify and iTunes!


Hashtags:

Book Talks, Stuffed and Starved, Rajiv Patel, British Indian, food system, inequality, starving, poverty, distribution, food technology, multinationals, liberalization, market, food supply chain, farmers, producers, manufacturers, retailers, consumer base, buying desks, agricultural products, packed food, processed food, frozen food, retailer chains, sustainability, CO2 emission, NAFTA, North American Free Trade Agreement, US farmers, subsidies, Gimsa, Minsa, industrial corn flour market, structural power, multinational, local market, soy, wheat, Ukraine, local farmer, supply chain, African farmers, European market, African market, scaling up farms, efficiency, industrial large scale agriculture, regenerative agriculture, community supported agriculture, diversified crops, maize producers, subsidized corn, agricultural business, spice company, seasoning company, Olam, Fairtrade.

May 03, 202333:13
7.1. Stuffed and Starved - inequality in our food system, the free market and consequences for farmers

7.1. Stuffed and Starved - inequality in our food system, the free market and consequences for farmers

Welcome to our season called "Book Talks." In the first two episodes, we will cover the book "Stuffed and Starved - the hidden battle for our world's food system."

The author Raj Patel is a British Indian. Academic journalist and activist. He holds a Ph.D. in development and sociology from Cornell University. In this book, he focuses a lot on the inequality of our food system. The book's main thesis is that more people are overweight than people who are starving. And that's solving the issue is now our food system is not just about increasing yield. It's much more a poverty and distribution issue.

I'm joined by my amazing co-host Frank Kuehne. He's the managing partner of the Adalbert-Raps Foundation, which offers grants for scientific research in food technology, but more on that later. Let's jump right in.


LINKS

Get funding for your food science research: https://en.raps-stiftung.de/

Find out more about the book Stuffed and Starved

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Connect with the host, Marina https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Connect with the host, Frank https://www.linkedin.com/in/frankkuehne/

More info and links to resources on  https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Please rate the podcast on Spotify and iTunes!


Hashtags:

Book Talks, Stuffed and Starved, Rajiv Patel, British Indian, food system, inequality, starving, poverty, distribution, food technology, multinationals, liberalization, market, food supply chain, farmers, producers, manufacturers, retailers, consumer base, buying desks, agricultural products, packed food, processed food, frozen food, retailer chains, sustainability, CO2 emission, NAFTA, North American Free Trade Agreement, US farmers, subsidies, Gimsa, Minsa, industrial corn flour market, structural power, multinational, local market, soy, wheat, Ukraine, local farmer, supply chain, African farmers, European market, African market, scaling up farms, efficiency, industrial large scale agriculture, regenerative agriculture, community supported agriculture, diversified crops, maize producers, subsidized corn, agricultural business, spice company, seasoning company, Olam, Fairtrade.

Apr 26, 202328:57
S7 Trailer - Book Talks - Reviewing and discussing books on the future of food
Apr 13, 202301:21
End of year regen ag season & upcoming conferences to meet up

End of year regen ag season & upcoming conferences to meet up

Some updates! 1) Propose experts for our regenerative agriculture season here

https://redtogreen.solutions/experts/


2) Any ideas for partners for our regen ag season? Pls write me :)

https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


3) Join the Hack Summit 11.-12.05. in Switzerland

https://www.hacksummit.co/


4) Agrivest Future of Farming Conference 06.11.23 in Tel Aviv

https://www.agrivestisrael.com/


5) Food Tech IL 07.-08.11. in Tel Aviv

https://www.foodtechil.com/


6) The Adalbert Raps Foundation offers grants for academic research on food tech and food sustainability. Check 'em out

https://en.raps-stiftung.de/


Apr 11, 202305:25
6. Season final - a summary and quiz on biotech in food - on precision fermentation, biomass fermentation, molecular farming and more

6. Season final - a summary and quiz on biotech in food - on precision fermentation, biomass fermentation, molecular farming and more

I have something very special for you. You can see it as a quiz to test your knowledge and also a way to find out which topics you still want to look into more deeply. For each episode, I will ask you a question, give you time to answer it, so you don’t need to stop the audio, and then share how I would answer it. Even if you don’t come up with the answer, trying to look for it engages your brain differently. And helps to change “I heard something” to “I learned something.


Mentioned Resources
Jack Whitehall Comedy Gig

Paul Pimsleur - the active retention language learning approach

The US lags behind other agricultural nations in banning harmful pesticides


Other podcast episodes mentioned

From season 2 - PLA - plastic without fossil fuels

Season 5 final - questionable regulation and pink slime beef


LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program: https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Connect with the host, Marina https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out our supporter of this season, FoodLabs, and their Climate Program: https://www.foodlabs.com/

More info and links to resources on  https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Please rate the podcast on spotify and iTunes!


Hashtags:
biotechnology, biotech, food biotechnology, food development, future of food, food innovation, food tech, food technology, alt proteins, alternative proteins, precision fermentation, biomass fermentation, molecular farming, cell-based milk, cultured meat

Mar 08, 202332:16
6.12. Regulatory approval in Europe vs. the US and Singapore with Seth Roberts from The Good Food Institute Europe
Feb 22, 202336:52
6.11. The investor's perspective on biotech 🎢 in food with Foodlabs Principal Christian Guba
Feb 15, 202330:55
6.10. Scaling food biotechnology 📈 bioreactors, inputs and brains. Challenges and opportunities with Good Food Institute Lead Scientist Elliot Swartz

6.10. Scaling food biotechnology 📈 bioreactors, inputs and brains. Challenges and opportunities with Good Food Institute Lead Scientist Elliot Swartz

We need to scale. But how? The biotech space is will go through some growing pains. Find out about scalability issues like bioreactor capacity, the supply of inputs, and the lack of brains. As well as lessons we can learn from vertical farming companies that are already a step or two further down the line.

Join me for a chat with Elliot Schwartz, he is the Lead Scientist for Cultivated Meat at The Good Food.

If you are not familiar with precision fermentation check out t episode 1 of this season where we explain a bunch of the terms.

LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out our supporter of this season, FoodLabs, and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  


Hashtags for this episode

Bioreactor capacity
Fermentor
Scaling Biotechnology
Scaling food technology
Cultured Meat
Cultivated Meat
Cell-based meat
Lab-grown meat
Future of cultured meat

Hashtags for this season

Biotechnology in food
Food Tech
Food Technology
Future of Food
Food Innovation
What is biotechnology food
Food biotechnology examples
Food biotechnology startups
Biotechnology food companies
Biotech food in usa
Food biotechnology examples


Editor's note: this episode was lengthened with a ProVeg shout out at minute 8:30

Feb 08, 202335:11
6.9. Molecular honey and building a biotech startup 🐝 - monoculture honey production & replacing it at the molecular level - plant-based honey alternatives with Melibio CEO Darko Madrich

6.9. Molecular honey and building a biotech startup 🐝 - monoculture honey production & replacing it at the molecular level - plant-based honey alternatives with Melibio CEO Darko Madrich

We lack bees, we lack insects and it's a severe issue for biodiversity. Because flowers are dependent on insects and vice versa, right?

So if you eat traditional honey, are you promoting bee health? No, large-scale monoculture is an issue in crop agriculture and beekeeping.

Hear from Darko Madrich, the co-founder and CEO of Melibio. I got to try their plant-based honey in Switzerland last year. And it tasted so similar I wondered whether they had just poured some natural honey into the bottle.

By the way, whenever I meet Darko, I feel his spirit animal would be a giant bumblebee. He has that vibe.

Anyway, Instead of using something like rice syrup, Melibio uses the compounds found in honey. Re-building it from the ground up.

In the future, they want to use precision fermentation to add a few compounds that are hard to replace. But is that necessary?


LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out our supporter of this season, FoodLabs, and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions



Hashtags for this episode

problems with honey

honey production

honey farming

pesticide impact on bees

honey alternatives

vegan honey

animal-free products

animal-free honey


Hashtags for this season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in usa

Food biotechnology examples



Editor's note: on 17.02. a 1,5-minute partnership message was added at minute 7. 

Feb 01, 202337:27
6.8. The dark side of 🍫 cacao and why we need alternatives to chocolate with WNWN Co-founder Ahrum Pak

6.8. The dark side of 🍫 cacao and why we need alternatives to chocolate with WNWN Co-founder Ahrum Pak

Why is the cacao trade so broken? Why does chocolate increasingly cause new rainforest areas to be cut down? What if we could make chocolate from other sources? Join us for this episode with WNWN co-founder Ahrum Pak.

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

Check out our supporter of this season, FoodLabs and their Climate Program: https://www.foodlabs.com/

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  


Hashtags for this episode

cacao-free chocolate

chocolate farming

cacao farming

impact of cacao

cacao alternatives

WNWN company

biomass fermentation

traditional fermentation

cacao fermentation


Hashtags for this season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in usa

Food biotechnology examples


Jan 25, 202330:60
6.7. A critical view on biotech 🔍 Is this healthy? Is this safe? 🤔 With journalist and author Larissa Zimberoff

6.7. A critical view on biotech 🔍 Is this healthy? Is this safe? 🤔 With journalist and author Larissa Zimberoff

The issue is "ingedientisation" - our foods are increasingly puzzled together from protein isolates, colorants, binders, additives, and more. It's January 2023. I recorded most of these interviews in August last year- we plan far in advance. And in the meantime, instead of becoming more excited about biotech, I have become more critical.

And that's not a negative development. And it's not a black-and-white state. Being in the industry is like being in an echo chamber of technocratic hype. It helps to step out once in a while and look at the bubble from the outside.

Most of the technologies we have discussed are about ingredients. So what about health? And that's what you will hear from Larissa Zimberoff, a Bay Area writer focused on the interplay between food, technology, and business. Her publications include: The New York Times, Bloomberg, and The Wall Street, and she wrote the book "Technically Food: Inside Silicon Valley's Mission to Change What We Eat" which is available as an Audible, ebook, and print.


Check out our supporter of this season, FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Hashtags for this episode

biotech critique 

biotech in food critique

food tech critique

food industry globalization

food safety issues


Hashtags for this season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in usa

Food biotechnology examples

Jan 18, 202328:52
6.6. Molecular farming: growing cow dairy 🐮 in plant cells 🌱 using genetic engineering - with Miruku CEO Amos Palfreyman

6.6. Molecular farming: growing cow dairy 🐮 in plant cells 🌱 using genetic engineering - with Miruku CEO Amos Palfreyman

What if you make a plant grow dairy proteins? A theme in this season is using new machines. New production hosts. But they are not made of steel or flesh and are all way smaller. This could be cells or fungi like yeast or bacteria used as machinery. So it becomes possible to produce certain ingredients more efficiently.

Another machinery that is pretty well-known to humans is planted. We are used to extracting, for example, pigments, proteins, and oils from them.

Plants naturally produce them. But what if plants could produce milk proteins? Or other fats?

This is called molecular farming.

Most likely, no way of conventional breeding will make a plant produce milk. You need genetic engineering.

Genetic engineering means taking DNA from a different organism, in this case, a mammal. And inserting this DNA into a plant.

This differs from Gene editing like CRISPR, where you only edit the existing DNA.

You will hear from Amos Palfreyman, the co-founder and CEO of Miruku, a New Zealand startup.

At first, you will hear how a biotech company realized it's a food company, then we cover the molecular farming technology and process and end with some thoughts on whether GMOs should be labeled.

This is our biotech in food season. Let's jump right in.


LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Hashtags for this season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in usa

Food biotechnology examples


Hashtags for this episode

Molecular Farming

Dairy alternatives

Dairy replacements

non-dairy milk

animal-free dairy


Jan 11, 202335:31
6.5. Cells as machinery 🍼 futuristic cell-based milk or cow-free milk made by growing glands with TurtleTree CSO Aletta Schnitzler

6.5. Cells as machinery 🍼 futuristic cell-based milk or cow-free milk made by growing glands with TurtleTree CSO Aletta Schnitzler

Glands would work like little milk machines. You give them the nutrients and boom you get the milk. Freaky, huh? You will find out why it's hard to re-create conventional dairy milk. And what technology may come after precision fermentation. Something we will call "cells as machinery." or cell-based milk.

To look into the future, you will hear from TurtleTree CSO Aletta Schnitzler. Turtletree develops dairy bioactive, so recreating parts of milk that are probiotic or have other health benefits. The bioactive can be added to plant-based products to make them more nutritious. But in parallel, they are also looking at the moonshot solution of using glands to produce milk.

So you would grow the glands and give them the necessary nutrients and environment to work as little milk machines. We will clarify this more in a few minutes. Cell-based milk is some of the crazier stuff I have come across in my research on biotech. So I hope you will enjoy this as much as I did. Let's jump right in


Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/


LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Topics and hashtags for this episode

Cells as machinery

Turtletree company

Cell biotechnology

Cell-based milk

what is cell-based milk

Cell-based cheese

Cell-based dairy

Bioreactor


Hashtags for the season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in USA

Food biotechnology examples


Editor's Note:

Seles - The episode has been re-edited and content between 15:46- 20:12 has been removed. (Feb 2023)

Marina - the episode has been shortened to 25 minutes ( Mar 2023)


Dec 21, 202226:52
6.4. Traditional Fermentation 🍷 Yogurt, kimchi and wine with Empirical Spirits Co-Founder Lars Williams

6.4. Traditional Fermentation 🍷 Yogurt, kimchi and wine with Empirical Spirits Co-Founder Lars Williams

We all have eaten fermented foods. Fermented foods are known to be great for the gut microbiome. But why is that the case? You will find out in this episode.

Some of the earliest archaeological evidence of fermentation is 13,000 years old. These residues of beer were found in Haifa, Israel.

For the longest time, humanity used fermentation without a clue what it's was all about.

You may remember Louis Pasteur from our food history episode on canning. He is known as the father of fermentation, as he uncovered the process in 1857.

Pasteur proved that living cells, yeast, were making sugar to alcohol. And that a microscopic plant caused the souring of milk - the lactic acid fermentation. You will hear more about it in a bit.

Pasteur figured microorganisms are responsible for good and bad fermentations, which spoil the taste of milk, wine and vinegar. He tested whether heat could sterilize products, and he was right. We now know this process as pasteurization. 

That led him to suspect that microorganisms may also be causing disease and enabled the development of vaccines.

During this season, we covered biomass, precision fermentation and gas fermentation. Before we move on to other topics, we round it up by looking into the past - traditional fermentation, also known as microbial fermentation. 

You will hear from Lars Williams, co-founder of Empirical Spirits, "The Man Behind The World’s Most Innovative Distillery" according to Forbes. They incorporate fermentation deeply into their process of making novel alcoholic drinks.


LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Hashtags and topics of the episode

Microbial Fermentation

microbial fermentation process

microorganisms in fermentation

sauerkraut history

Traditional fermentation

Kimchi fermentation

Kombucha fermentation

Lactic acid fermentation

Alcohol fermentation

acetic fermentation


Topics and hashtags of the season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in usa

Food biotechnology examples

Dec 14, 202229:52
6.3. Gas fermentation 🏭 proteins made from nothing except CO2, hydrogen and salt - with Arkeon Co-Founder and CEO Gregor Tegel

6.3. Gas fermentation 🏭 proteins made from nothing except CO2, hydrogen and salt - with Arkeon Co-Founder and CEO Gregor Tegel

What if you could make pure protein by feeding microbes CO2 and hydrogen? This technology is independent of soil and sun and just badass. Sci-Fi is real, I tell you. Sci-Fi is real. 


In this season we have looked at precision fermentation and biomass fermentation. If that doesn't mean much to you, don't worry. You will still be able to understand this episode. Both of these technologies need some kind of input.

For example yeast in precision, fermentation needs sugars and other nutrients mixed into the broth in the bioreactor. And in solid biomass fermentation, you for example would need some kind of grain for the mycelium, the root structure of a mushroom, to grow in.

But what if you wouldn't need any agricultural input? What if you could use a microbe that is so badass that it makes proteins from CO2 and hydrogen?

Gregor came across gas fermentation on a quest to find the most sustainable food humanity can produce. You will hear from Gregor Tegl, co-Founder and CEO of Arkeon today, a company based in Austria.


LINKS

Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Show notes

DNA sequence comparisons consistently categorize all living organisms into 3 primary domains:

Bacteria that are classified as prokaryotes Archaea (Arkea)

Bacteria and Archaea are called prokaryotes, which means they are unicellular organisms. And they were likely the first ones on planet earth. Almost all prokaryotes have a cell wall, a protective structure that allows them to survive in extreme conditions. That isn't always the case for the third type.

Eukarya (also called Eukaryotes) includes us and all other animals, plants, and fungi. All organisms whose cells have a nucleus to enclose their DNA apart from the rest of the cell.

The bottom line is that different technologies and processes tap into different types of organisms.

Most fermented foods, including kimchi and sauerkraut, are made using bacteria.

Precision fermentation also uses bacteria, but they are most likely genetically engineered, as well as yeast, which is part of the fungi kingdom.

But this second category, the Archaea, survives incredibly extreme environments and deserves special attention.

Don't worry if that was too much info all at once. You will find this part in the show notes if you want to read it.


Hashtags and topics for the episode

gas fermentation

arkeon biotechnologies

Pressure fermentation importance

Why is fermentation important

what does fermentation yield

Carbon utilization in food


Hashtags for the season

is biomass fermentation safe

what is biomass fermentation

what is microbial biomass in fermentation

nature's fynd

Plant based cheese

Plant based cream cheese


Dec 07, 202239:43
6.2. Three types of biomass fermentation 🍄 & how they compare to precision fermentation - biotech in food with Nature's Fynd CSO Debbie Yaver

6.2. Three types of biomass fermentation 🍄 & how they compare to precision fermentation - biotech in food with Nature's Fynd CSO Debbie Yaver

How biomass fermentation is different from precision fermentation and why fungi are such wonderful solutions for everything from alternative proteins to plastic replacements to biodiesel. Together with Chief Scientific Officer of Nature's Fynd, Debbie Yaver, we get into the weeds. You will also learn about 3 types of biomass fermentation.

Nature's Fynd has raised a total of 500 Million US dollars. They are working on two kinds of cream cheeses and two different breakfast patties. How? Using a badass fungus that was discovered in a NASA-funded project, more about that in a few minutes.

This is episode two of our reason on biotech in food, for an introduction check out our previous episode. This episode is a bit technical but also packed with lots of valuable information! Let's jump right in

Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Hashtags and topic for the episode

is biomass fermentation safe

what is biomass fermentation

what is microbial biomass in fermentation

nature's fynd

Plant based cheese

Plant based cream cheese


Hashtags for this season

Biotechnology in food

What is biotechnology food

Food biotechnology examples

Food biotechnology startups

Biotechnology food companies

Biotech food in usa

Food biotechnology examples

Nov 30, 202229:24
Season 6: An introduction to biotech in food  precision and biomass fermentation, molecular farming & more with Irina Gerry from Change Foods

Season 6: An introduction to biotech in food precision and biomass fermentation, molecular farming & more with Irina Gerry from Change Foods

Scientists and founders use cutting-edge technologies to make ingredients with less. Less water. Less land. Less greenhouse gas emissions. But also with more. More climate resilience. More functionality. More nutrients.

Here are some technologies you will understand by the end of this season:

precision, biomass, and gas fermentation molecular farming and using cells as machinery.

Check out our supporter of this season FoodLabs and their Climate Program:
https://www.foodlabs.com/

Check out our supporter of this season ProVeg Incubator and their 12-month incubator program:
https://provegincubator.com/

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Hashtags / topics for this episode: Biomass / precision fermentation / molecular farming

is precision fermentation gmo

will biomass be used in the future

what is precision fermentation

what does fermentation yield

precision fermentation process

precision fermentation definition

precision fermentation definition

precision fermentation process

is biomass fermentation

what is biomass fermentation

what is microbial biomass in fermentation

are biotech foods safe for humans

what is biotechnology in food industry

can biotech foods help feed the world

what is biotechnology in food industry

Why food biotechnology is important

How can food biotechnology help food safety

How does food biotechnology increase food production

Nov 23, 202228:33
5.12. Season Final ☢️ The Pink Slime Scandal - ammonia in ground beef 🥩 food history for the future of food

5.12. Season Final ☢️ The Pink Slime Scandal - ammonia in ground beef 🥩 food history for the future of food

Here's one of the wildest stories of (lacking) food regulation in the US: In 2008 over 70% of all ground beef sold in the US contained "pink slime," - ammonia-treated scraps.

These trimmings would usually be processed into pet food and cooking oil due to higher levels of fecal contamination.

Well, the company Beef Products Inc found a way to kill the E.Coli and Salmonella bacteria by spraying the scraps with ammonia and increasing the PH to 9.5.

After all, the human food market is more profitable than pet food.

Grrreat....

But then it all blew up, starting with an investigative news story by the New York Times in 2009 (and winning the author Michael Moss a Pulitzer Prize)...



Sep 07, 202228:52
5.11. How China became the second largest dairy nation 🧀 a tale of a lactose intolerant society and political influence. Food history for the future of food

5.11. How China became the second largest dairy nation 🧀 a tale of a lactose intolerant society and political influence. Food history for the future of food

Since 2020 China is the second largest dairy market globally and it’s right on track to exceed the US and become Nr 1. How did milk go from the image of being barbarian to being seen as a valuable necessity for strong, healthy babies? How is the communist party of China using milk as a political tool? And insights into how small cultural changes can have massive repercussions if your culture is freaking 1,4 billion people large. Oh man, get ready for this one.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


(Part of the script)

If you go way back in history the root of this development can be found in the optimum wars in the 19th century. I am quoting Jian Yi, from the China Good Food Fund: “You have to understand the psychology here – there is a sense in China that we have been humiliated ever since the opium wars, but that now we are no longer going to be humiliated by foreign powers.”

China has had an extensive history of severe famines like The Great Chinese Famine 1959, which was highly influenced by agricultural reforms.

Through most of the imperial dynasties until the 20th Century, milk was generally seen as the disgusting food of barbarians.

For most of the 20th Century, milk had a relatively low profile in China. China's economy was closed to the global market, and its production was minimal. Throughout the Mao era, milk was in short supply, rationed to those deemed to have a particular need: infants and the elderly, athletes, and political party staff above a particular grade. Therefore, milk was considered a special treat: When Richard Nixon visited China in the early 70s, he was given White Rabbit candy as a gift, a chewy white caramel made of milk solids.

As China opened up to the market in the 1980s, after Mao’s death, dried milk powder began appearing in small shops where you could buy it with state-issued coupons. Jian Yi’s parents bought milk powder because they thought it would make him stronger. “It was expensive, I didn’t like it, I was intolerant, but we persuaded ourselves it was the food of the future.”

In a little over 30 years, milk has become the symbol of a modern, affluent society and a sign of a country that can feed its people. The average person in China has gone from barely drinking milk to consuming about 30kg of dairy products a year. Though that is still just a bit more than 1/10th of American dairy consumption, it matters if 1,4 billion people do it.

The transition has been driven by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), for which milk is not just food but a critical strategic tool. For a country that was not long ago stricken by famine, the ability to afford animal products, particularly milk has been marketed as a visible symbol of the Party's success. Also, during the one-child policy, the CCP made a social pact with the people: while family size might be limited, the state would make sure that each couple's offspring would be as strong as it could make them. Feeding children milk took on great importance in maintaining that image. The CCP created a market for milk where there had been none before and invested heavily in developing a domestic dairy industry. 



Aug 24, 202214:26
 5.10. The failure of the New Coke - How Coca Cola flopped in a race to better taste - food history for the future of food

5.10. The failure of the New Coke - How Coca Cola flopped in a race to better taste - food history for the future of food

In April 1985, the Coca-Cola Company decided to discontinue its most popular soft drink and replace it with a sweeter formula it would market as “New Coke.” As soon as the decision was announced, a large percentage of the US population boycotted the drink and made sales plummet for the company. Outrage over pulling the original coke recipe was high, and after only 79 days of introducing New Coke, the product was pulled from shelves and the original Coke returned. So what went wrong?

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

As the Pepsi Challenge had highlighted millions of times [over], Coke could always be defeated when it came down to taste. So in what must have been seen as a logical step, Coca-Cola developed a new formula and conducted 200,000 taste tests to see how it fared. The results were overwhelming. Not only did it taste better than the original, but people also preferred it to Pepsi-Cola.

Coca-Cola decided it was time to make a drastic decision that, to this day, is considered extraordinary in the history of brand marketing. They changed the recipe for the first time in 100 years and created “New Coke,” the sweeter alternative favored in the blind taste tests. They pulled all traditional Coca-Cola from store shelves and replaced them with the new formula, leaving consumers with no option but to drink New Coke instead of the Coke they had known before.

The company expected sales to rise, and they initially did. But the outrage and drop in sales that followed were unprecedented and unexpected.

Aug 17, 202210:38
5.9. How faulty science destroyed an industry 💣 the boom, bust and rise of bubble tea 🧋 food history for the future of food
Aug 10, 202209:44
5.8. How microwaves and freezers changed food culture forever 🥡 Food history for the future of food.

5.8. How microwaves and freezers changed food culture forever 🥡 Food history for the future of food.

Microwave is hard to beat for sheer convenience. But the most significant food tech innovation of the 1940s wasn't welcomed with open arms. It took decades of struggles before it rocketed to success in the 1980s.

Red to Green is a food tech podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more. 

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


The first microwave 'electric range' for the home kitchen was launched in 1955, retailing at $1295. It took more than a decade for a more affordable model to arrive, still costing nearly 500 bucks. 30 years after the first commercial model, microwave ovens had made it into less than 10% of American kitchens.

Ad campaigns selling "the greatest cooking discovery since fire" with futuristic and science language may have backfired. As the cold war heated up, fears around any radiation grew. Positioning microwaves as something novel, cutting-edge and techy possibly didn't appeal to the actual users at that time - homemakers.

Despite the introduction of safety standards in the 70s and multiple studies showing microwaves don't mess with the nutritional qualities of food, conspiracy theories about them continue to pop up today.

Early ads for microwaves also promoted how homemakers could cook what they already made, but faster – a roast chicken, done in 30 minutes! However, despite claims of speed and convenience, it could take a home cook hard work to get good results. Microwaves can only penetrate about 2.5 cm into foods, so they tend to cook food unevenly unless they are cut small enough.

They also typically don't produce the caramelization and Maillard reactions, which are delicious browning of foods that make baking cookies and roasting meats smell mouth-watering. If you try onions in a pan with oil, they become nicely brown. If you put them in the microwaves, they will soften up in a puddle of fat.

Also, they tend to dry food out, making a chicken chewy - in the wrong way. As a result, speedy, homemade microwave meals could be inconsistent and uninspiring compared to their oven-baked or stovetop cousins. However, a revolution in convenience and consistency was already underway in another part of the kitchen – the freezer.

Frozen ready meals had been around for a while - Swanson's famous TV Dinners were introduced in 1953 and frozen on the tray used for cooking and serving. Meals like this saved time on planning, shopping, and washing up – They were hugely popular by the 1970s, and late in the decade, food companies and microwave oven manufacturers spotted a chance to team up.

Frozen meals could be incredibly uniform. You might not beat a home cook in quality by formulating recipes and designing packaging specifically for microwave cooking, but you could get a consistently alright meal fast.


Aug 03, 202215:47
5.7. The global supply of bananas 🍌 is threatened - again. Lessons on the issues of monocultures and pesticide resistance. Food history for the future of food.

5.7. The global supply of bananas 🍌 is threatened - again. Lessons on the issues of monocultures and pesticide resistance. Food history for the future of food.

Before 1960, the main export banana was called the Gros Michel. Why can’t we eat the Gros Michel anymore today? Because it has become virtually extinct due to Panama disease affecting it over many decades, driving it to its eventual near-extinction. The fungi infection ravaged banana plants across the globe, from Asia to Africa, exterminating plant after plant. The fact that the fungi spread worldwide at a relatively rapid pace highlights a severe problem with our current agricultural practices.

If a pest or disease figures out how to infect one of the banana plants, it has all the information it needs to infest all of them, as the same genetic material means the other plants have no defense left to fight against the disease.

A solution needed to be found, and it presented itself in The Cavendish, a variety that was discovered to be almost entirely resistant to Panama disease. It quickly replaced the Gros Michel on plantations as the export banana and has become the banana we know and eat regularly today. Today, 99% of exported bananas and 47% of global banana production is the Cavendish variety.

But now, our current flaky banana is threatened - as history repeats itself. The Panama disease is back, and it's upgraded. The new strain is called Tropical Race 4 and is found on Cavendish plantations across Asia, Australia, the Middle East, and Africa.

Daniel Bebber, leading researcher of the BananEx research group at the University of Exeter, researches solutions for the spread of the Panama disease and puts it like this:

"The story of the banana is really the story of modern agriculture exemplified in a single fruit. It has all the ingredients of equitability and sustainability issues, disease pressure, and climate change impact all in one. It's a very good lesson for us."

These are great examples of the importance of understanding coupled human-environment systems. That's an environmental science concept that, in essence, says that humans impact the environment, and the climate impacts humans. It's essential to understand them both as systems, including many complex, interacting parts that form a whole working system.


Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Jul 27, 202212:38
(reupload) 3.12. Season 3 final: Toxic Positivity ☣️ why benefits are not enough - lessons from the fossil fuel industry 🛢️ on personal climate action with Prof. Kimberly Nicholas, Dr Gulbanu Kaptan

(reupload) 3.12. Season 3 final: Toxic Positivity ☣️ why benefits are not enough - lessons from the fossil fuel industry 🛢️ on personal climate action with Prof. Kimberly Nicholas, Dr Gulbanu Kaptan

we are approaching the end of this season on promoting alt proteins. Today you will hear from two speakers, our first is - Kimberly Nicholas, a Senior Lecturer in Sustainability Science at Lund University in Sweden. Kimberly holds a Ph.D. in Environment and Resources from Stanford University. She has published over 50 articles on climate and sustainability in leading peer-reviewed journals and is the author of the book “Under the Sky we Make - how to be human in a warming world.” I love her take on toxic positivity and how pointing out the issues of the existing system, e.g. animal agriculture, is important to drive change. 

Our second guest is Dr Gulbanu Kaptan, Associate Professor in Behavioural Decision Making at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on judgement and decision making with a special interest in food-related decision making and risk (benefit) communications.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.
More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510
Thanks to our partners of this season

Atlantic Food Labs: Atlantic Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/
NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

Jul 22, 202229:52
5.6. Too fast, too cheap, too explosive - how tin cans 🥫 caused scandals and a revolution in preservation - food history for the future of food

5.6. Too fast, too cheap, too explosive - how tin cans 🥫 caused scandals and a revolution in preservation - food history for the future of food

Even something as useful as a tin can - a revolution in food preservation - was not safe from the repercussions of safety scandals. The problem of food preservation is at least as old as agriculture. Humans have been very creative at finding ways to salt, dry, smoke, pickle, freeze, and ferment foods to keep them edible after the harvest ends – many of these traditions date back millennia and remain alive today.

come in pretty handy, even if they aren't particularly exciting. I know I have plenty gathering dust in the back of a cupboard [myself]. But if you stop to think about it, the humble tin can is [actually] a bit of a modern miracle.

On the other hand, canning is remarkably new in comparison – its 200th birthday was only in 2010. But it works almost unbelievably well. In 1974 some canned goods were retrieved from the wreck of a steamboat that sank in the Missouri River. When they were opened, the oysters, peaches, and tomatoes were analyzed and found to be safe to eat, even after 100 years underwater in tin cans. (Though none of the scientists seems to have been brave enough or hungry enough [actually] to try any.)

Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/


Jul 20, 202214:11
5.5. Why Italians feared 🍅 tomatoes and how Heinz and 🍕 Margherita changed that - history for the future of food

5.5. Why Italians feared 🍅 tomatoes and how Heinz and 🍕 Margherita changed that - history for the future of food

Tomatoes used to be something scary; many Italians feared tomatoes believing they were poisonous. People were killed because they ate tomatoes, especially women. Yes. It sounds absurd nowadays. But the success of the tomato was a turbulent journey that took over 300 years.

Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510


In Germany, there is the saying, "What the farmer doesn't know, he won't eat." During the 15th century, many foods came to Europe as immigrants.

Christopher Columbus and his crew set sail west in August 1492. He hoped to get his hands on gold and spices in America. When he returned to Europe, his clients, the Spanish kings, were disappointed. Instead of gold and spices, Columbus returned with seeds, grains, tubers, and dried leaves from these four journeys.

His crew ate cooked potatoes on the way back to Europe, which saved them from scurvy. What looked so unimpressive would turn out to be crucial. These ingredients would shape Europe's eating habits for decades to come.

This is what historians call the Great Columbian Exchange.

For the first time in history, potato and tomato plants ventured beyond the Americas.

While both of these vegetables are now a basic ingredient of our diets, they didn't have such a warm welcome in Europe. People were (and still are) easily suspicious of unknown foods. The reasoning is just different. Back in the day novel foods were often associated with witchcraft and poison. But fortunately, not everything was lost. Eventually, people came around, so let's find out why.

Jul 13, 202214:18
5.4. How the butter lobby 🧈 made margarine pink and illegal and spread smear campaigns 🕵️‍♀️ claiming it includes stray cats and arsenic - food history for the future

5.4. How the butter lobby 🧈 made margarine pink and illegal and spread smear campaigns 🕵️‍♀️ claiming it includes stray cats and arsenic - food history for the future

How politicians were buttered up to make margarine selling illegal, how the spread ended up in some dirty smear campaigns and how Margarine changed colors from white to bright pink to our known buttery yellow.

Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Thanks to our partners of this season
Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

In 1866, French emperor Napoleon III. was considering the fact that no war can be won without strong and healthy soldiers. As an energy source, the French army was relying on nutritious butter, among other things. But butter had the disadvantage of being expensive and turning rancid quite quickly in a time without cooling facilities.

So that year, the Emperor offered a reward of 100.000 Goldfranc to anyone who could come up with a suitable, cheap replacement. Three years later, a chemist Mège-Mouriès presented the solution: A mixture of beef fat, salt, sulfate of soda, gastric juices of a pig, and a little cream, all heated and mixed into a butter-like substance.

At first, he dubbed his invention “beurre économique”, the cheap butter, but changed his mind. He renamed the mixture “oleomargarine”, from the Latin “oleum”, meaning beef fat, and the Greek “margaron”, meaning pearl, because of its pearly shine. That name was later shortened to “margarine”.

Mège-Mouriès invention had the texture of a jelly, but at least it tasted like butter and won him Napoleon´s prize. The product didn´t really take off, though. In 1871, Mège-Mouriès sold the patent to a Dutch company called Jurgens which eventually became part of Unilever, still one of the leading manufacturers of margarine to this day.

Jul 06, 202214:37
5.3. A poor man's meal: 🦞 lobster. How a sea insect made it from cat food to president's dinner plate. Food history for the future of food.

5.3. A poor man's meal: 🦞 lobster. How a sea insect made it from cat food to president's dinner plate. Food history for the future of food.

Up into the 1800s, lobster was considered trash food in the U.S., fit only to feed prisoners, the poor, and cats. Surprising, huh? How did lobster rise from the dirty bottom of the food preference list to float at the very top amongst the high society? Find out how lobsters were entangled in protests and revolts of servants, snuck into passengers' foods on train rides, and were even caught up in World War II.

Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Thanks to our partners of this season
Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

The American lobster is native to the Atlantic coast of North America, mainly from Labrador to New Jersey. In the early days of the first settlers and way up into the middle of the 19th century, lobsters were so plentiful in this area that people could wade into the water and catch what they needed for dinner with their hands.

While early colonists depended on the crustaceans for much of their food, the sheer abundance of the animal didn't help its popularity. When lobsters washed up on the shore after storms, they were considered smelly trash and used for fertilizer in the fields. They were the cheapest source of protein available in the area and therefore regarded as undesirable peasant food, too bland to be edible for discerning tastes.

As 19th-century American navy captain and politician John J. Rowan stated: "Lobster shells about a house are looked upon as signs of poverty and degradation." Lobsters were also a common food in prisons, much to the displeasure of inmates, and were the food of servants.


Jun 29, 202212:58
5.2. The struggle of the (devils) fork🍴 to become your cutlery of choice - food history for the future of food

5.2. The struggle of the (devils) fork🍴 to become your cutlery of choice - food history for the future of food

While the knife and the spoon have been around for a bit longer, the fork had a tough journey. Being accused of the death of a queen, associated with prostitution, and being the star of a 1-year celebrity tour in France.

Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Thanks to our partners of this season
Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

Jun 22, 202215:10
SE5: Food history for the future of food - how potatoes 🥔 saved (and killed) millions of lives and went from pig's food to a world wide staple 🍟

SE5: Food history for the future of food - how potatoes 🥔 saved (and killed) millions of lives and went from pig's food to a world wide staple 🍟

Jun 15, 202217:58
4.12. Food waste Final: the farmers 🚜 perspective on food waste and how it is connected to regenerative agriculture

4.12. Food waste Final: the farmers 🚜 perspective on food waste and how it is connected to regenerative agriculture

The place where food waste happens is not necessarily where food waste is caused. We find that everything is much more interconnected than we would think. We have looked at food waste throughout the supply chain. How it can be reduced when food is shipped, sold in supermarkets, and wasted by us all - the consumers.

But there is one piece missing.

And per definition, it's supposedly not even part of the problem.

The farm.

The place where food is actually created. Any food wasted there is usually seen as food loss. Mostly due to bad weather, pests or just bad fortune. But as we have seen time and time again throughout red to green: words matter. While waste seems to be caused by humans, loss sounds like it's just something that happens. Something we can't really address...

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510
Thanks to our partners of this season

Thanks to our partners of this season

Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Feb 09, 202229:23
4.11. Make corporates accountable for food waste 🕵️: how big business avoids responsibility with Carrie Bradshaw

4.11. Make corporates accountable for food waste 🕵️: how big business avoids responsibility with Carrie Bradshaw

If you could make the world leaders adopt 1 piece of the legislature on food waste - which one should it be? According to Carrie Bradshaw it should be extended producer responsibility. Make the big players accountable for the issues they cause up and down the supply chain.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.
More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510
Thanks to our partners of this season

Atlantic Food Labs: Atlantic Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

Jan 26, 202225:50
4.10. The chef's 🧑‍🍳 perspective: regional, circular, zero waste cooking to reduce food waste and how it's connected to cultural traditions, respecting food and creativity with Root Radicals

4.10. The chef's 🧑‍🍳 perspective: regional, circular, zero waste cooking to reduce food waste and how it's connected to cultural traditions, respecting food and creativity with Root Radicals

I know we tend to be quite tech-centric at Red to Green and that's why I find it quite important to include the chef's perspective. This interview may not give you a bunch of hard facts but I believe it may inspire you with a different way to look at food and food waste. From a standpoint of cultural traditions, respect, and creativity.

Monica Kisic Aguirre, originally from Peru, holds a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and dedicated 12 years of her life to doing research, before she switched and became a chef and artist, with now 10 years of experience in the culinary scene.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.
More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510
Thanks to our partners of this season

Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers. 

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology. 

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Jan 18, 202222:46
4.9. Why dumpster diving is illegal 🚨 - an activists view on food waste and food loss with Matt Homewood

4.9. Why dumpster diving is illegal 🚨 - an activists view on food waste and food loss with Matt Homewood

Some call it dumpster diving, I call it food rescuing, our interview guest Matt calls it urban harvesting. Every day retailers throw away still perfectly edible food. And activists like Matt Homewood document their finds and share them on social media platforms - like Instagram and LinkedIn. And there is much to find.

For the past 3 years Matt has been an active food waste campaigner and recently shared his work at cop 26. Today we talk about what it takes to get big corporations to change, how retailers are the oligopoly of the food system and the moral dilemma of doing something illegal for a good cause.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.
More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Thanks to our partners of this season

Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/


This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.   

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.  

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Jan 11, 202231:41
4.8. The psychology 🧠 of food waste: sharing is caring with OLIO Co-Founder and CEO Tessa Clarke

4.8. The psychology 🧠 of food waste: sharing is caring with OLIO Co-Founder and CEO Tessa Clarke

One person's trash is another person's treasure. Some food that you throw in the bin is something that other people in your community may value. OLIO is an app that exists to tackle the enormous problem of waste in our homes and also local communities.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.
Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included
1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat
2. plastic alternatives
3. promoting alternative proteins


Thanks to our partners of this season
Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

Dec 29, 202135:36
4.7. Restaurant waste: you can't manage what you can't measure. Why some restaurants waste more, psychological nudges and how AI can help solve the problem with Winnow CEO Marc Zornes

4.7. Restaurant waste: you can't manage what you can't measure. Why some restaurants waste more, psychological nudges and how AI can help solve the problem with Winnow CEO Marc Zornes

Winnow helps restaurants track, monitor, and reduce their food waste using AI-driven solutions. Find out how food waste is created in restaurant, how that helps both sustainability and what is the most wasteful restaurant model.


Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.
More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions
Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510
Thanks to our partners of this season

Atlantic Food Labs: Atlantic Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

(This episode has been changed and updated 01.03.2022)

Dec 22, 202121:12
4.6. Less fresh -> lower prices 💸 how dynamic pricing can help reduce food waste with Wasteless Co-Founder and CEO Oded Omar

4.6. Less fresh -> lower prices 💸 how dynamic pricing can help reduce food waste with Wasteless Co-Founder and CEO Oded Omar

If one steak inspires in a week and the other already in 3 days, shouldn't there be an incentive to people to buy the one closer to expiry? Most of there time there isn't and this is what Wasteless is addressing. With their AI they integrate into retailers' shop systems to recommend when to discount which products or even provide electronic shelf labels which update the price automatically. 

Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.
More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and on iTunes

Thanks to our partners of this season
Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins


Dec 15, 202125:51
4.5. The wholesalers perspective on food waste 🛒 - influencing governments to adopt food banks, measuring food waste in a corporation and partnering with startups.

4.5. The wholesalers perspective on food waste 🛒 - influencing governments to adopt food banks, measuring food waste in a corporation and partnering with startups.

You get a look at food waste from a wholesaler's perspective, you will learn about the challenges in different countries. What it looks like to address food waste as a corporation and how the relationship between retailers and wholesalers affects how much food ends up in the bin.

Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ 

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green. 

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/   

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions  

Please leave a review on Spotify and on iTunes

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Dec 08, 202127:58
4.4. Apeel: an invisible layer that keeps produce fresh 🥑- why cosmetics of food lead to food waste and the importance of a good supply chain with Jenny Du from Apeel

4.4. Apeel: an invisible layer that keeps produce fresh 🥑- why cosmetics of food lead to food waste and the importance of a good supply chain with Jenny Du from Apeel

We need skin to keep ourselves healthy. Apeel has created extra skin for fresh produce to extend its shelf life and avoid food waste. Apeel is a company that creates an invisible layer covering produce. So your avocado would last much longer. But why?

Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and on iTunes

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Dec 07, 202127:10
4.3. The struggle of keeping fresh produce fresh 🥦- behind the scenes at retailers with Afresh Co-Founder and CEO Matt Schwartz

4.3. The struggle of keeping fresh produce fresh 🥦- behind the scenes at retailers with Afresh Co-Founder and CEO Matt Schwartz

Food waste problems are 100x more complex with fresh produce: vegetables, fruits and leafy greens. Find our why and how artificial intelligence can help retailers buy the right amount of produce at the right time. In this episode you will also learn about the psychological biases and structural issues that lead to overbuying and excess food waste. 


Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and on iTunes

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Nov 24, 202129:15
4.2. From farm 🌾 directly to fork🍴 skipping retail and food waste with a direct to consumer model - a case study of the Chinese e commerce giant Pinduoduo with Xin-Yi Lim

4.2. From farm 🌾 directly to fork🍴 skipping retail and food waste with a direct to consumer model - a case study of the Chinese e commerce giant Pinduoduo with Xin-Yi Lim

Learn how the Chinese e-commerce giant Pinduoduo skips distribution centers, wholesalers, and retailers by connecting farmers directly to consumers. Is "direct-to-consumer" a model that reduces food waste? What about other issues like packaging?

Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and on iTunes

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Nov 17, 202135:54
4.1. An introduction to food waste 🥗: it's impact, causes and solutions with Dr. Ned Spang from UC Davis

4.1. An introduction to food waste 🥗: it's impact, causes and solutions with Dr. Ned Spang from UC Davis

Learn about the impact of food waste, how it is created, and what we need to do to address it Dr. Ned Spang Associate Professor at UC Davis. This is an introduction to the topic of food waste before we dive deeper into focus-topics with farmers, distributors and retailers.  

Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and on iTunes

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This episode is part of the food waste season. Food waste is a leading cause of climate change and an important topic if we want to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable, and from Red to Green. This podcast season looks at food waste and food loss throughout the supply chain including farmers, distributors, retailers, and consumers.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology.

Past Red to Green Podcast seasons included  1. cellular agriculture / cell-based meat / cultured meat 2. plastic alternatives 3. promoting alternative proteins

Nov 10, 202131:08
3.8. Industry lobbying and communicating the hard things ⚡ about animal agriculture with Irina Gerry CMO of Change Foods

3.8. Industry lobbying and communicating the hard things ⚡ about animal agriculture with Irina Gerry CMO of Change Foods

We discuss the role of talking about the health benefits of cultured products and how critical it is to actually point out the problems of the existing industry to drive change. I love that Irina disagrees with some of the previous interview guests that we have had this season. I appreciate her boldness in standing up for what she believes in.

In this episode, you will hear from Irina Gerry from Change Foods. Change Foods uses precision fermentation to create real dairy without the cow, more about that in a few minutes. Prior to that, she has been a Senior Brand Manager in Plant-based innovation at Danone.

This was such a great interview it was really hard to cut because it hits many of the most interesting topics: activism science manipulation and industry lobbying


Connect with Marina Schmidt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ 

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina Schmidt at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/ 

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

Oct 25, 202150:58
3.11. Understanding is not enough 🔍 sociopolitical questions of cultured meat - farmers future, power dynamics, patents with food & social scientist Dr. Charlotte Biltekoff

3.11. Understanding is not enough 🔍 sociopolitical questions of cultured meat - farmers future, power dynamics, patents with food & social scientist Dr. Charlotte Biltekoff

This episode will make you reflect on some bigger topics and ask some bigger questions. It’s a very valuable and contrarian perspective that we haven’t had in this season on promoting alternative proteins. Charlotte Biltekoff is an associate professor at UC Davis in American studies and in food science and technology.

For many years she has been studying the relationship between food and culture, how values and beliefs shape people’s eating habits but also the connection between food and social order. She investigates how food becomes good or bad and has particularly looked into the agrifood tech sector in the Bay Area. 

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.


More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  


For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions


Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes

This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more. 


Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Thanks to our partners of this season

Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

Jun 23, 202133:43
3.10. Open access research 🧪 including farmers and cell-based censorship in the US with Good Food Institute Scott Weathers

3.10. Open access research 🧪 including farmers and cell-based censorship in the US with Good Food Institute Scott Weathers

This episode is filled with good news: learn more about plant- and cell-based censorship in the US, the role of open access research to grow cellular agriculture, and how to engage farmers in the transition.

You will hear from Scott Weathers Senior Policy Specialist from the Good Food Institute, also known as GFI. GFI is a leading nonprofit working internationally to accelerate alternative protein innovation.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  


For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes

This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Thanks to our partners of this season

Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/


Jun 16, 202134:20
3.9. ❌ Censoring dairy alternatives: Amendment 171 in the EU - it's history, impact and lessons with Ronja Bertholdt from the European Vegetarian Union

3.9. ❌ Censoring dairy alternatives: Amendment 171 in the EU - it's history, impact and lessons with Ronja Bertholdt from the European Vegetarian Union

You may have heard of Amendment 171 in Europe. It aims to restrict plant-based dairy companies like Oatly immensely. They would not be able to call their product oat milk, creamy, or anything associated with conventional animal-based dairy. Possibly they wouldn’t even be able to package the products the same way milk is packaged.

Between recording and launch of this episode, the Amendment was dropped. - fortunately! Anyway, the alternative protein industry will have many more battles to face. It’s important for us to understand how legislature develops, is evaluated, and how we can influence it. Thus, this episode can help us learn from the past to brace ourselves for the future.

You will hear from Ronja Bertholdt, the Head of Public Affairs of the European Vegetarian Union and former Political Outreach Officer for ProVeg International.


Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.  

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/  

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

 

Jun 09, 202128:03
3.7. 🧀 Dairy and 🐟 fish vs. cultured meat 🧫 the difference in perception, production and promotion with Raffael Wolgensinger CEO of FORMO and Lou Cooperhouse CEO of BlueNalu

3.7. 🧀 Dairy and 🐟 fish vs. cultured meat 🧫 the difference in perception, production and promotion with Raffael Wolgensinger CEO of FORMO and Lou Cooperhouse CEO of BlueNalu

The difference in the process of consumer perception of dairy and fish vs. Cultured meat products.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/  

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

 


May 26, 202145:04
3.6. Branding 🍖 cultured products: the naturalness trap with Nicky Quinn, Global Marketing Director of 🚀 Aleph Farms

3.6. Branding 🍖 cultured products: the naturalness trap with Nicky Quinn, Global Marketing Director of 🚀 Aleph Farms

Nicky Quinn has more than 15 years of experience in marketing and branding across multiple sectors including hospitality, biotech, and consumer goods for brands such as Nestle, Four Seasons, and Voss. Currently, she is Global Marketing Director for Aleph Farms, a cultivated meat company based in Israel. Aleph Farms growing delicious beef steaks, isolated from a cow, using a fraction of the resources required for raising an entire animal for meat, and without antibiotics.


Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/  

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/


May 19, 202134:47
3.5. Addressing skeptics of cultured meat - conspiracies 👽 & fake news about "frankenstein" meat with Dr. Daniel Jolley

3.5. Addressing skeptics of cultured meat - conspiracies 👽 & fake news about "frankenstein" meat with Dr. Daniel Jolley

Yes, finally - conspiracy theories! What an interesting topic. While we do focus on the term “conspiracies” the basic principles we talk about also apply to the questions “why do people believe in conspiracies? how do we convince skeptics? How do we engage in communication? How should we deal with fake news”

There hasn’t been much research done on conspiracy theories until recently and Prof. Daniel Jolley is one of the people leading this field. He is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at Northumbria University in the UK. His research focuses on the consequences of conspiracy theories and has been featured on BBC, in the New York Times, The Guardian, Financial Times, Huffington Post etc.. In 2020 to date, his media engagement has had an estimated reach of 1 billion people.
I haven’t seen the topics of cultured meat conspiracies discussed anywhere else in such detail so I am excited for you to listen in!

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/  

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

 


May 12, 202135:48
3.4. 🦄 Startup vs. 🏛️ Corporate: stop bashing animal agriculture & the importance of industry acceptance with Jack A Bobo

3.4. 🦄 Startup vs. 🏛️ Corporate: stop bashing animal agriculture & the importance of industry acceptance with Jack A Bobo

You find out how plant-based and cell-based companies shouldn't just think about consumer acceptance but also industry acceptance. We often tell a story of us against them in industry lobbying. The cool, mission-driven plant-based and cell-based startups against the evil conventional meat industry. And I must say it’s also been a storytelling approach that I have followed. But it has a downside: creating confrontation and friction, possibly stalling the growth of the alternative protein space. Our today's guest - Jack a bobo has lots of rather unusual, controversial opinions which will get you thinking. There were so many intriguing, twitter-short quotes that we could have filled a 5-minute intro just with that. Def. listen till the end and share it with colleagues and friends in the industry.

You are listening to the 4th episode of our season 3 on promoting alternative proteins. You can listen to this episode on it’s own but when you have time check out our other episodes as well cause they build upon each other!

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/  

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/


May 05, 202148:21
Season 3: Promoting alt proteins 🍔 building transparency, community and brand with Isha Datar from New Harvest | Alternative proteins | Cultured Meat | Cellular Agriculture

Season 3: Promoting alt proteins 🍔 building transparency, community and brand with Isha Datar from New Harvest | Alternative proteins | Cultured Meat | Cellular Agriculture

How a well-known meal replacement brand leveraged Reddit communities to become the most successful in the world. And how snack foods could be the Trojan horse, convincing people of novel foods they wouldn’t have tried otherwise. You will hear from Isha Datar the executive director of New Harvest. NewHarvest is a non-profit funding, academic research, shaping the safety conversation, and directing the future of cellular agriculture. Isha has co-founded perfect day making milk without cows and Clara Foods, making eggs without chicken.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

 For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on Spotify and iTunes This episode is part of our season on promoting cellular agriculture and alternative proteins. Alt proteins are a rather recent development in the food industry and face some challenges on the consumer acceptance front. In the first season of Red to Green you will find an explanation of cell ag - whether you want to call it cultured meat, cell-based meat, cultivated meat, clean meat, or anything similar. This season is a follow-up and focused on the big challenges of cellular agriculture including socioeconomic questions, industry branding, nomenclature, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/  


Apr 21, 202143:06
🎁 Bonus resource: 200 impact areas 💥 a purpose guide to help realize in what field you want to create change.

🎁 Bonus resource: 200 impact areas 💥 a purpose guide to help realize in what field you want to create change.

The key to finding my life's passion was a spreadsheet (that's not even a joke.) ..7 years ago I co-founded a company in career consulting (still running). I talked with >hundreds< of professionals who hit the glass ceiling of Maslow's hierarchy of needs in their "golden job cages." Safe, well-paid, but no self-transcendence - no impact that is in line with their values.

At some point I had to ask myself: wait, is career consulting in line with >my< passions and values? Ehh.. well it wasn't. #oops

I was very lucky that a friend shared a life-changing resource with me. It covers 120+ impact areas across food, politics, mobility, energy and many other fields with 400+ example companies.

I rated the impact areas on a scale of 0 = I wouldn't roll around in bed for this and 10 = I am willing to pack my luggage and travel across the world. My 9's were and are food waste, alt proteins, vertical farming, regenerative agriculture, and plastic replacements. My only 10 was cellular agriculture.

I stared at it with an open mouth. I was AMAZED. Seriously. How was it possible that I didn't realize everything is connected to food? This is why I started the Red to Green Podcast because these are ALL the topics I care about.


Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Thanks to our partners of this season

Atlantic Food Labs: Atlantic Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

NX-Food: NX-Food stands for Next Generation Food and focuses on consultancy, community, partnership and startup value creation – because the future of food needs to be shaped. https://nx-food.com/

As well as our media partners The Spoon & Foodentrepreneurs


Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green. 


This episode has been shortened and edited on 03.03.2022

Apr 14, 202105:24
SE2 Final: Consumer VS. Corporate Responsibility 🚨 is plastic recycling greenwashing? Are we harming our environment by focusing on consumer instead of corporate responsibility? - Marina Schmidt

SE2 Final: Consumer VS. Corporate Responsibility 🚨 is plastic recycling greenwashing? Are we harming our environment by focusing on consumer instead of corporate responsibility? - Marina Schmidt

Is consumer responsibility sometimes a greenwashing trap? Are we harming our environment by overly focusing on individual responsibility vs. corporate responsibility? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, #greenwashing can be defined as “expressions of environmentalist concerns, especially as a cover for products, policies, or activities."

In simpler words, greenwashing is used to deceive customers into believing a product, service or action is better for the environment than it actually is.

Our social media lead Myra Bari recently shared a great post on “six sins of greenwashing”:

Vagnueness. Being purposely non-specific about operations or materials Lesser Evil: applying a do-good label to an environmentally unfriendly product Irrelevance: Claiming to avoid using a material or practice that is already illegal or non-standard Hidden Trade-off: suggesting a product is green based on a single environmental attribute No proof: making an environmental claim that cannot be substantiated Fibbing: Making environmental claims that are simply false

And in this episode I would like to talk to you about a 7th sin we have come across:
 “Pushing the responsibility on consumers to deflect from corporate responsibility”.

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To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

Check out the Red to Green Website for the show notes and more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

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Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction.
https://foodlabs.de/

This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more. 

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Feb 10, 202114:38
2.11. Is this the solution? 🔮 Compostable plastics & industrial composting - here is why we need it / Part 2 with Ramani Nayaran from the Michigan State University

2.11. Is this the solution? 🔮 Compostable plastics & industrial composting - here is why we need it / Part 2 with Ramani Nayaran from the Michigan State University

Researching plastic packaging and possible alternatives is a tricky topic. With lots of greenwashing, and also well-intentioned misinformation. During this deep-dive season, we were left wondering: Is there a scalable solution to our plastic problem at all? Now obviously a global problem requires a range of approaches. BUT This interview with Ramani Nayaran was a refreshing breeze of hope. Ramani is Distinguished professor of the Michigan State University,

To hear the first part of this interview check out episode 2.10. Alternatively, you can listen to this as a stand-alone episode.
We discuss why industrial composting is crucial and inevitable and look further into the potential of compostable plastics.

To get an introduction to the topic check out some of our earlier episodes.

If you work in the field or know someone working on compostable products, check out at gcaimpacts.org. They are sincerely committed to pushing the field forward and you can get involved for example as a member at gcaimpacts.org

Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Feb 03, 202135:48
2.10. Plastic 🍬 without oil 🛢️: a solution to our problem - the wonders of PLA and industrial composting, with Dr. Ramani Nayaran - Part 1

2.10. Plastic 🍬 without oil 🛢️: a solution to our problem - the wonders of PLA and industrial composting, with Dr. Ramani Nayaran - Part 1

Part 1: Imagine a world in which our global plastic production would not be based on fossil fuels but renewable resources. A world in which we would still enjoy the convenience of plastic but it would marine degrade within 5-10 years, a short blip of time compared to conventional plastic. Imagine a world in which our products would leave no traces of microplastics, would be kinder to our planet, our animals, and our own health.

What if that future would be possible? Yes, doable? And what would it take?

This is a deep-dive interview and extremely insightful. Seriously, if you don’t listen to any other interview in this season, please listen to this one. We do get quite technical, so it helps if you know the terms compostable, biodegradable, bio-based, and PLA. You can get an introduction to the topic in episode 2.3. or alternatively your search engine of choice will work as well.

Ramani Narayan is a Distinguished Professor at the Michigan State University, renowned for their education on packaging

He has eighty refereed publications in leading journals, fourteen patents, and has edited three books

Ramani serves as the scientific chair of the Biodegradable Products Institute, North America.

We are both advisors to the Global Compostable Alliance. GCA seeks to unite compostable packaging producers.

If you work in the field or know someone working on compostable products, check out at gcaimpacts.org. They are sincerely committed to pushing the field forward and you can get involved for example as a member at gcaimpacts.org


Thanks to our partners of this season Food Labs: Food Labs is a leading European VC and company builder in food, health & sustainability. They cover the entire value chain – from ag-tech, alternative proteins, water supply, food security, decentralized food production, vertical farming, to food waste and carbon reduction. https://foodlabs.de/

This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Jan 27, 202130:14
2.7. Styrofoam made from mushrooms 🍄 Mycelium makes waste into home compostable packaging. Circular, renewable, sustainable - with Paul Gilligan from Magical Mushroom Co

2.7. Styrofoam made from mushrooms 🍄 Mycelium makes waste into home compostable packaging. Circular, renewable, sustainable - with Paul Gilligan from Magical Mushroom Co

What if there is an alternative that uses waste and creates a fully renewable alternative using fungi, which per definition, can safely go back to the earth? When you have something shipped, whether it be bottles of wine, some tech gadgets, or even furniture pieces, they need protection - the white, lightweight material is polystyrene, also known as styrofoam. Widely used for transportation, it is hardly recycled and 40% ends up in landfills. Today you will hear from Paul Gilligan, the CEO of The Magical Mushroom Company. spent 14 years at the supermarket chain Sainsbury’s in a range of senior roles, where he won several industry awards.

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for the show notes and more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510


This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.


Jan 12, 202133:32
2.6. Large-scale reuse 🍾 A successful case study of the German reuse system and buying groceries circular with Circolution Co-Founder Kirils Jegorovs

2.6. Large-scale reuse 🍾 A successful case study of the German reuse system and buying groceries circular with Circolution Co-Founder Kirils Jegorovs

How can reusable packaging help to reduce plastic waste? How could a system look like in which we buy for example our lentils, yogurts, and coffee in reusable glass jars and return them to be used - again, and again, and again? What are examples of large-scale reusable systems that are already successful today? You will hear this and much more from Kirils Jegorovs the Co-Founder and Lead Link of Circolution, a System Development company dedicated to building a system of Reusable Packaging scalable to all food segments, starting in Germany. Previously he worked in retail and developed new products for consumer goods companies such as Johnson & Johnson, Hochland, and Nestle. He also helped Mitte - a startup developing a water purification and remineralization device - to make their product circular.

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for the show notes and more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510


This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.


Dec 16, 202036:44
2.5. Algae-based edible packaging 🌊 Notpla revolutionizes coatings, films, and sachets with a home-compostable solution

2.5. Algae-based edible packaging 🌊 Notpla revolutionizes coatings, films, and sachets with a home-compostable solution

The power of seaweed - are algae the source of the packaging of the future? What role does edible packaging play for sustainable solutions? And How does the innovative packaging startup Notpla inspire lots of consumers and companies through their edible packaging solutions? You will hear from Lise Honsinger, the CFO, and COO of Notpla, a company based in the UK that has raised over $6 Million. Beforehand Lise worked in Private Equity investing in renewable energy, including financing the first grid-connected solar in the Philippines and kick-starting their nation's race for solar energy. Notpla is one of the coolest startups in the sustainable packaging space with a great brand and lots of momentum.


Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for the show notes and more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510


This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.


Dec 08, 202039:48
2.4. 100% Made From Waste: Compostable Service Ware 🍽️ Using Sugarcane Residue and self-generated energy with Ved Krishna from Yash Pakka

2.4. 100% Made From Waste: Compostable Service Ware 🍽️ Using Sugarcane Residue and self-generated energy with Ved Krishna from Yash Pakka

What are the up and downsides of compostable packaging? How is the manufacturer Yash Pakka creating compostable packaging from agricultural waste? And how do they manage to generate their own energy and be one of the few companies doing their own chemical recycling, producing in a circular manner? You will hear from Ved Krishna. Ved is the Executive Vice Chairman and Strategy Head of the company Yash Pakka. Yash Pakka is based in India, was founded in 1981, and went public in 2002. With over 500 full-time employees, 1200 including contract workers the manufacturer aims to replace single-use plastic, specifically in the gastronomy sector.

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for the show notes and more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510


This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.


Dec 02, 202038:47
2.3. Greenwashing 👮 Lifecycle assessments, BPA linings, & what Tetra Pak doesn’t want you to know 🤫 with Paul Foulkes-Arellano

2.3. Greenwashing 👮 Lifecycle assessments, BPA linings, & what Tetra Pak doesn’t want you to know 🤫 with Paul Foulkes-Arellano

How sustainable are Tetra packs, aluminum cans, and glass jars? How are corporates using hidden greenwashing tactics? What does a circular economy of packaging look like? You will hear from Paul Foulkes-Arellano, the founder of the sustainable design alliance, based in London. Paul focuses on sustainable innovation and we met at an impact summit in Spain a few years ago. He has 30 years of experience in innovation and strategic brand consultancy across the world. I had a lot of fun talking with him and I hope you will enjoy the interview as much as I did.

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ 

Check out the Red to Green Website for the show notes and more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Nov 25, 202040:01
2.2. Biodegradable, Compostable or Recyclable? 😶‍🌫️ ♻️The Difference and Misconceptions with Material Value Author Julia Goldstein

2.2. Biodegradable, Compostable or Recyclable? 😶‍🌫️ ♻️The Difference and Misconceptions with Material Value Author Julia Goldstein

What is better: biodegradable, compostable, bioplastics, bio-based plastics, recycled? And what do all of these terms actually mean? It’s important to understand the differences to be able to judge materials. You will hear from Julia Goldstein the author of the book Material Value, which was a Finalist in the 2019 San Francisco Writers Contest and has been recommended to me. Julia is a writer with a material science background and trade press experience. Her second book Rethink the Bins is released on 30 November 2020.

Mentioned Resources:

B Corporation https://bcorporation.net/about-b-corps

Benefit Corporation https://benefitcorp.net/

Julia Goldstein Author Website https://www.juliagoldsteinauthor.com/

Julia Goldstein Business Content Website https://www.jlfgoldstein.com/

Recommended Resources:

Update: On San Francisco refusing compostable containers in their facilities https://www.sfexaminer.com/news-columnists/compostable-containers-dont-end-up-where-you-think-they-do/

Food to the rescue: San Francisco Composting https://www.nrdc.org/resources/san-francisco-composting

This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Nov 18, 202035:34
SE2: Plastic Alternatives & Sustainable Food Packaging 📦 | Plastic Toxicity | Recycling Greenwashing | Marina Schmidt & Nick Johnson

SE2: Plastic Alternatives & Sustainable Food Packaging 📦 | Plastic Toxicity | Recycling Greenwashing | Marina Schmidt & Nick Johnson

Find out what is awaiting you in this upcoming season and why replacing plastics is so crucial not only for the environment but for your personal health. We will share some research results on microplastic toxicity. You will hear learnings that we had so far including from one of the best documentaries that we have found in the space on how recycling is used as greenwashing. Also, we discuss how a 30 day less packaging challenge that turned out to become the best health-hack I ever tried will hopefully inspire you to benefit from it as well.

You will find the show notes on our website https://redtogreen.solutions/s2e1-plastic-alternatives-marina-schmidt/

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

This is a season on plastic alternatives - discussing food packaging and sustainable materials. Alternative packaging options are slowly developing. More and more packaging startups are developing plastic replacements based on fungi or algae. Bioplastics or bio-based plastics like PLA are becoming more resilient. In this season we discuss topics like industrial composting, home composting, compostability, biodegradable and compostable material, single-use plastic, plastic recycling, food waste recycling, and more.

Red to Green is a food tech and sustainability podcast. We cover current food technology topics in-depth with a focus on sustainable innovations. Learn about the food industry in deep-dive seasons featuring industry leaders from food tech startups, corporates, and important VCs. Sustainable food is more than improving individual buying behaviors. Red to Green seeks to move the food industry from harmful to healthy, from polluting to sustainable from Red to Green.

Nov 11, 202019:06
SE1 final: The future of cellular agriculture 🔮 additional resources and tips 🎁 Cultured Meat Podcast Alex Shirazi and CellAgri Ahmed Khan

SE1 final: The future of cellular agriculture 🔮 additional resources and tips 🎁 Cultured Meat Podcast Alex Shirazi and CellAgri Ahmed Khan

To finish the season on cell AG you will find further resources, helpful websites and initiatives in this episode. It is time for a summer break and we will continue at the end of September with the topic "Replacing single-use plastics in the food industry." 


Mentioned links

Good Food Institute
https://www.gfi.org/

New Harvest
https://www.new-harvest.org/

Aleph Farms
https://aleph-farms.com/sustainability/

Cultured Meat Podcast
https://cleanmeatpodcast.com/

Cultured Meat Symposium
https://2019.cmsymp.com/

CellAgri
https://www.cell.ag/

----

Get in touch with Red to Green

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/  Check out the Red to Green Website for more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at redtogreensolutions@gmail.com

----

Partners

Thanks to our partner Atlantic Food Labs
The leading European VC in Food, Sustainability, and Health: https://foodlabs.de/

Ecosystem Partners
Eatable Adventures a leading global Innovation Hub developing tomorrow’s food businesses: www.eatableadventures.com
Join their community  www.foodentrepreneurs.com

This season about cellular agriculture covers all the verticals: meat, cheese, fish, shrimp, and more. The nomenclature is a bit confusing but when we talk about cellular agriculture or cell-ag most people associate cell-based meat with it. Other terms commonly used are cultivated meat, cultured meat, cell-cultured meat, clean meat, or even in-vitro or synthetic meat.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology. Red to Green covers cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.


Aug 04, 202015:21
13. The investor's perspective on cell AG & the challenge with European consumers - Atlantic Food Labs, Big Idea Ventures & NX-Food

13. The investor's perspective on cell AG & the challenge with European consumers - Atlantic Food Labs, Big Idea Ventures & NX-Food

This episode features 3 interview guests and gives you a great overview of the opportunities, untapped developments and challenges of cell ag. I'm excited to introduce you to the perspectives of two investors from Atlantic food labs and Big Idea Ventures, as well as the perspective of Fabio teams in who is a thought leader in Germany, in Europe.

To start out, you will hear from Maximillian Bade, who is supporting ambitious founders at Atlantic food labs. You will hear about their criteria for investing in plant-based and cell based companies, the opportunities in personalized nutrition. And we also briefly discussed the topics, plant fungi, and insect-based protein.

Next you will hear from Andrew D. Ive, he is the founder and managing general managing partner of big idea ventures.  We discuss, how the mindset within corporates shifted with sustainability commitments towards both consumers and investors and how that is affecting the food industry. We also touch upon the effect of COVID-19 on the development of cultivated meat, as well as the fourth tier of select companies emerging, which you could call delicacy meats.

Next up is Fabio wood seems the founder and director of NX-foods, the food innovation hub of the wholesaler and Founder and Chairman of Balpro the German association for alt proteins. We talk about European consumers, the importance of very clear communication, and what a good sell ag marketing and wholesaler strategy could look like.

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Episode Links

Interview 1: Maximilian Bade
https://www.linkedin.com/in/maximilian-bade/

Atlantic Food Labs
https://foodlabs.de/

Interview 2: Andrew D. Ive
https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewive/

Big Idea Ventures
https://bigideaventures.com/

Interview 3: Fabio Ziemmsen
https://www.linkedin.com/in/fabio-ziemssen-food-innovation/

NX-Food
https://nx-food.com/

METRO AG
https://www.metroag.de/en/

Balpro - German association for alt proteins
https://balpro.de/

----

Get in touch with Red to Green

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Let's connect on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/  Check out the Red to Green Website for more info https://redtogreen.solutions/  

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at redtogreensolutions@gmail.com

----

Partners

Thanks to our partner Atlantic Food Labs
The leading European VC in Food, Sustainability, and Health: https://foodlabs.de/

Ecosystem Partners
Eatable Adventures a leading global Innovation Hub developing tomorrow’s food businesses: www.eatableadventures.com
Join their community  www.foodentrepreneurs.com

Jul 30, 202038:26
 12. Private Patents, Monopolies, and Lobbying: Obstacles for Cellular Agriculture with New Harvest Executive Director Isha Datar

12. Private Patents, Monopolies, and Lobbying: Obstacles for Cellular Agriculture with New Harvest Executive Director Isha Datar

Why is there comparatively so little science on creating animal products without animals? Why are pharma companies more interested in cellular agriculture startups than food companies? How has the field developed in the last 5 years? This is an interview with Isha Datar the Executive Director of New Harvest about this fascinating emerging industry and the importance of public research.

Isha published an important research paper called "Possibilities for an in-vitro meat production system" in 2010, when very few people even know about the possibility of creating animal products without animals. She co-founded Perfect Day, making milk without cows and Clara Foods, making eggs without chickens. New Harvest is an important non-profit research institute fund and conducts open, public, collaborative research that reinvents the way we make animal products - without animals.

Get involved with Red to Green as a volunteer or ambassador
https://redtogreen.solutions/getinvolved

Check out New Harvest:

https://www.new-harvest.org/

Get in touch with Isha:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/ishadatar


Get in touch with Red to Green

Please leave a review on iTunes
https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Let's connect on LinkedIn!
https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for more info
https://redtogreen.solutions/

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at redtogreensolutions@gmail.com

-----

Thanks to our partner Atlantic Food Labs
The leading European VC in Food, Sustainability, and Health: https://foodlabs.de/

Ecosystem Partners
Eatable Adventures a leading global Innovation Hub developing tomorrow’s food businesses: www.eatableadventures.com
Join their community  www.foodentrepreneurs.com

Jul 21, 202033:05
11. Shrimp Human Health and Sustainability Issues & Creating Clean, Cell-based Shrimp with Shiok Meats CEO & Co-Founder Dr. Sandhya Sriram

11. Shrimp Human Health and Sustainability Issues & Creating Clean, Cell-based Shrimp with Shiok Meats CEO & Co-Founder Dr. Sandhya Sriram

Did you know that farmed shrimp is often grown in sewage water or slaughter farm runoffs? The shrimp end up all dark and oily and then get dunked into antibiotics. This is a standard industry practice but it doesn’t have to be this way.

In this episode you will hear from Dr. Sandhya Shriram, she is Co-Founder & CEO of Shiok Meats. They create cell-based clean seafood, starting out with Shrimp. Shiok was founded 2018 in Singapore and has raised 7.6M so far. Shiok one of the top featured, very promising leaders of the industry.

Stay tuned if you want to learn about the effect of the seafood industry on sustainability and your health, why growing shrimp is so different from growing, for example, a burger patty and Sandhyas learnings from being a founder including tips on how to work with the press.

Sandhya TEDx speaker and has been featured in Forbes Women in Tech. She has a background in Biological Sciences and Biotechnology with a PhD in stem cell biology.


Get involved with Red to Green as a volunteer or ambassador
https://redtogreen.solutions/getinvolved

Connect with Shiok

Dr. Sandhya Sriram's LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandhyasriram/

The Shiok Website
https://shiokmeats.com/

-----

Get in touch with Red to Green

Please leave a review on iTunes
https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Let's connect on LinkedIn!
https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for more info
https://redtogreen.solutions/

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at redtogreensolutions@gmail.com

-----

Thanks to our partner Atlantic Food Labs
The leading European VC in Food, Sustainability, and Health: https://foodlabs.de/

Ecosystem Partners
Eatable Adventures a leading global Innovation Hub developing tomorrow’s food businesses: www.eatableadventures.com
Join their community  www.foodentrepreneurs.com

Jul 14, 202034:43
10. Steak without Cow: The First Cultured Meat in Space & Becoming Carbon Neutral with Aleph Farms Co-founder & CEO Didier Toubia

10. Steak without Cow: The First Cultured Meat in Space & Becoming Carbon Neutral with Aleph Farms Co-founder & CEO Didier Toubia

Aleph Farms is working on the hardest challenge, the holy grail, of cultured meat: whole steaks. Compared to for instance burger patties steaks are harder because they are three-dimensional and combine a variety of different textures. Aleph farms is also the first company in the emerging industry to commit to net-zero carbon emission by 2025 and zero-carbon throughout the entire supply chain by 2030. And as if that isn’t enough they are also the first company to create cultured meat in space. Aleph Farms is one of 100 tech pioneers chosen by the World Economic Forum.

This episode on steak without cows features Didier Toubia, the Co-Founder & CEO of Aleph Farms.

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Connect with Aleph Farms

Didier Toubia's LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/in/didiertoubia/

The Aleph Farms Website
https://aleph-farms.com/

The Gen Z Program
https://aleph-farms.com/sustainability/

-----

Get in touch with Red to Green

Please leave a review on iTunes
https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

Let's connect on LinkedIn!
https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Check out the Red to Green Website for more info
https://redtogreen.solutions/

For sponsorships, collaborations or feedback write Marina at redtogreensolutions@gmail.com

-----

Thanks to our partner Atlantic Food Labs
The leading European VC in Food, Sustainability, and Health: https://foodlabs.de/

Ecosystem Partners
Eatable Adventures a leading global Innovation Hub developing tomorrow’s food businesses: www.eatableadventures.com
Join their community  www.foodentrepreneurs.com


Jul 07, 202033:24
9. How Cultured Fat & Foie Gras is Produced - Peace of Meat MD David Brandes and CPO Eva Sommer

9. How Cultured Fat & Foie Gras is Produced - Peace of Meat MD David Brandes and CPO Eva Sommer

Plant-based meat alternatives can get a big taste upgrade by using cultured duck fat, making them not vegetarian but hybrid products. These are more attractive to flexitarians or meat-eaters and can, therefore, make it easier to reduce meat consumption. Additionally, we talk about their cultured foie gras, the fatty duck liver. Find out the production steps involved in producing these animal-free cultured products.

Find out more about Red to Green: https://redtogreen.solutions/
Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Jun 30, 202031:49
8. Proteins made from CO2 and Hydrogen: Making Food from Air with SolarFoods CEO Pasi Vainikka

8. Proteins made from CO2 and Hydrogen: Making Food from Air with SolarFoods CEO Pasi Vainikka

Can you make food out of thin air? Yes, you can. And today you will hear from a company making this magic possible called Solarfoods. Their protein Solein is created by feeding microbes CO2 and hydrogen. This creates a mostly taste-neutral powder that can be used to replace animal protein or stronger tasting plant protein pretty much anywhere. Soleins carbon footprint is about 5x smaller than the footprint of plant protein and 100x smaller than the one of animal protein.

Find out more about Red to Green: https://redtogreen.solutions/
Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Jun 23, 202034:15
7. Plant-based and Cell-based Pet Food will Disrupt a Broken Industry - CEO Wild Earth Ryan Bethencourt

7. Plant-based and Cell-based Pet Food will Disrupt a Broken Industry - CEO Wild Earth Ryan Bethencourt

There are a few industries that absolutely could use a disruption, pet food is one of them. Learn about the problems and opportunities in the pet food space, which is actually quite fascinating, how cultured meat could rattle the industry, and hear a fun story of how Ryan was forced to eat a 6-dog-meals  equivalent of his own dog food.

Find out more about Red to Green: https://redtogreen.solutions/
Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Jun 16, 202030:18
6. Cell-based Fish: Plastic & Pollutant-free Seafood - BlueNalu CEO Lou Cooperhouse on Cellular Aquaculture
Jun 09, 202036:01
5. Reducing Fats by 50% and Replacing Palm Oil and Butter - CUBIQ Foods CEO Andres Montefeltro on Cultivated Fat and Omega-3 from Poultry
Jun 02, 202030:12
4. Cheese without Cows: The First-ever Taste Test of Cell-based Mozzarella - LegenDairy Co-Founder & CSO Dr. Britta Winterberg
May 26, 202031:04
3. Japans Leading Cultured Meat Startup building Bioreactors and Growing Meat at Home - Integriculture CEO Yuki Hanyu
May 19, 202029:40
2. An Introduction to Clean Meat 🥩 & why it is Game Changing - "Clean Meat" Author and The Better Meat Co. CEO Paul Shapiro

2. An Introduction to Clean Meat 🥩 & why it is Game Changing - "Clean Meat" Author and The Better Meat Co. CEO Paul Shapiro

You can have your meat without needing to raise and slaughter an animal: Clean meat, also known as cultivated meat will be a game-changer. Find out how cellular agriculture works, how it can improve our environment and personal health, and when you get to see clean meat on the shelves.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/ To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.  More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/   For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions  Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510  

This season about cellular agriculture covers all the verticals: meat, cheese, fish, shrimp, and more. The nomenclature is a bit confusing but when we talk about cellular agriculture or cell-ag most people associate cell-based meat with it. Other terms commonly used are cultivated meat, cultured meat, cell-cultured meat, clean meat, or even in-vitro or synthetic meat.

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology. Red to Green covers cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

May 12, 202035:18
SE1 Introduction 👋 How can we make our food system sustainable? Red to Green & Season 1 on Cellular Agriculture / Cell-based Meat / Cultivated meat / Cell-cultured Meat

SE1 Introduction 👋 How can we make our food system sustainable? Red to Green & Season 1 on Cellular Agriculture / Cell-based Meat / Cultivated meat / Cell-cultured Meat

Find out what awaits you on this podcast, a little backstory about how I tried 7 different diets in a self-experiment, and how our food system, sustainability, and our personal health are closely linked! This is the start of season 1 on Red to Green covering the topic of cellular agriculture /cultivated /in-vitro meat.

Connect with Marina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/
To stay up-to-date for future episodes take 3 seconds to click on “follow” and subscribe to Red to Green.

More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/  
For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions

Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510

This season about cellular agriculture covers all the verticals: meat, cheese, fish, shrimp, and more. The nomenclature is a bit confusing but when we talk about cellular agriculture or cell-ag most people associate cell-based meat with it. Other terms commonly used are cultivated meat, cultured meat, cell-cultured meat, clean meat, or even in-vitro or synthetic meat. 

Red to Green is a media company and education initiative. With our deep-dive audio seasons on food tech & sustainability topics, we seek to promote awareness of problems and potential solutions in the food industry. Our reporting makes complex industry topics accessible to the general public, while also going deep to educate industry professionals and external investors about the most important development in food technology. Red to Green covers cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more.

May 11, 202013:40
0. The Red to Green Trailer - what awaits you

0. The Red to Green Trailer - what awaits you

This 1-2 minute sneak peek shows you what awaits you on Red to Green podcast. 

This is the Red to Green Podcast on food Innovations that are better for the planet and better for you. Learn from top industry leaders in alternative proteins, food waste, plastics, and agriculture. To discover game-changing breakthroughs in the future of food Subscribe now.    
May 10, 202001:29